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9 things charities want companies to know about asking to volunteer

Posted By Volunteer Toronto, May 12, 2017
Updated: May 12, 2017
 
Estimated reading time: 1 minute

 

You’ve probably experienced it: a corporate team says they want to volunteer—all 50+ of them, this month and at the same time and place. Sounds like a great idea, but is it manageable for your organization? The truth is, probably not. So how can you marry their goodwill with a meaningful and realistic volunteer experience? 

 

This spring, Volunteer Toronto hosted a Subscriber Circle, bringing together volunteer managers from across the city to talk about best practices in volunteering in the corporate sector. Dozens and dozens of requests come in to non-profits every month asking for large groups to volunteer, often with very specific ideas on their perfect team-building opportunity.

 

For the discussion, the group was joined by special guest Elizabeth Dove from Volunteer Canada. And as they set out to tackle the corporate challenge together, what came to light were nine pieces of advice—or things companies should consider—before embarking on employee volunteer initiatives, coming right from volunteer managers, like you, who respond directly to the requests.  

 

Read Volunteer Canada’s blog on 9 things charities want companies to know about asking to volunteer to see the group’s insights from the session.

Tags:  advice  best practises in volunteer engagement  corporate volunteering  supervising volunteers  volunteer coordination  volunteer management  volunteer managers  volunteer program  volunteer programs 

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3 Common Screening Practices That Might Be Barriers To Finding Great Volunteers

Posted By Melina Condren, Director of Engaging Organizations, January 26, 2017
Updated: January 26, 2017
 Image of dictionary meaning for

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

In my last blog post, I shared my thoughts on a common requirement that we see in position descriptions that acts as a barrier to lots of potential volunteers: fluency in English. I’d like to continue the discussion about reducing barriers to volunteering by outlining some common screening steps and why they might not always be the best option for finding the right volunteer for the right position.

First, I want to acknowledge that having a defined screening process and following all the necessary steps for every applicant is important. I’m not suggesting that you should skip screening steps or modify them based on the applicant’s needs, just that you should consider whether all the screening steps you’re using are actually necessary for the role. If not, you may be excluding a lot of potential volunteers.

 

Police Reference Checks:

Police checks are a very common screening step for volunteer positions, but they should only be used when necessary. In fact, it’s a violation of the Ontario Human Rights Code to base selection decisions on a criminal record unless it’s a bona fide requirement of the position; to learn more about Police Checks and the OHRC, check out our online course on the subject.

Police checks can be a barrier to many people for many reasons. People who are new to Toronto won’t be able to provide a police check from the area. People may not want to disclose information necessary for a police check, such as a name change, that is completely irrelevant to the position. And really, people just may not be willing to go through an unnecessary invasive process. Police checks are important for certain positions, but if they’re not necessary for the one you’re recruiting for, skip them.

 

Professional References:

Professional references can be a good way to learn about an applicant’s work style, and their strengths and weaknesses in a work context. But for applicants who are underemployed, new to the city, new to the workforce, or retired, providing relevant professional references can be a challenge. Think about whether you can get the information you’re looking for another way. Can you ask for a sample of relevant work to judge the quality for yourself? Can you find out about their reliability through a personal reference? If there’s a valid alternative to asking for professional references, consider making some changes to your screening process to make it more accessible to people who aren’t in the workforce.

 

Phone Interviews:

Sometimes a phone interview is used as a quick, convenient way to screen applicants. Although this definitely has its benefits, it can be difficult for some people to understand what’s being said and communicate clearly over the phone. Rather than removing phone and video interviews completely, you can be more accommodating to people’s needs by offering alternatives, such as an email or instant message interview, or a quick in-person interview.

 

Screening applicants is an incredibly important process for making sure you have the right volunteers in the right positions. By making sure that you remove as many barriers as possible from your screening process, you’ll be opening the doors of your volunteer program to a whole new pool of applicants.

 

Photo of Melina CondrenMelina Condren oversees all of Volunteer Toronto's services for organizations, including our training program, volunteer management conference, subscriptions program, and new Grassroots Growth project. Her priority is to ensure our services are effectively helping non-profits build capacity through volunteer involvement and continue to meet the ever-evolving needs of the voluntary sector.

Tags:  barriers to volunteering  finding volunteers  how to find great volunteers  leaders of volunteers  volunteer management  volunteer managers  volunteer screening  volunteer screening best practices 

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Ways To Adapt Your Volunteer Engagement for Event Volunteers

Posted By Kasandra James, Subscriptions Coordinator, December 8, 2016
Updated: December 7, 2016
 

Infographic: Ways To Adapt Your Volunteer Engagement for Event Volunteers 

 


As Volunteer Toronto’s Subscriptions Coordinator, Kasandra James is the first point of contact for non-profits looking for support. She facilitates monthly Subscriber Circles - discussion groups for managers and coordinators of volunteers, contributes to our Sector Space newsletter and social media communications, and makes sure our subscriptions package continues to help non-profit organizations build capacity through volunteer involvement. 

 

Tags:  best practises in volunteer engagement  Event volunteers  Infographic  orientation  recognition  recruitment  screening  training  Volunteer engagement  volunteer management  volunteer managers 

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Measure Twice, Cut Once - Evaluating The Effectiveness of Your Volunteer Program

Posted By Sammy Feilchenfeld, Training Coordinator, March 16, 2016
Updated: March 14, 2016
 

Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

A program evaluation is a process of reviewing all or part of a program to determine how efficiently and effectively it meets its goals. While you might be evaluating your volunteers regularly, you may not be evaluating the volunteer program itself! Through an assessment of key evaluation questions and determining proposed outcomes, you can collect data to analyze the success and impact of your volunteer program.

So why bother going through all of this effort? Here are a few great ways that a program evaluation can help you improve your volunteer program:

 

Measure efficiency

Do you sometimes struggle with finding work for volunteers to do? Do you have too many volunteers working on the same task? Your program’s efficiency can be improved by determining the work that needs to be done and the best way to do it (how many volunteers & volunteer hours, for example).

 

Measure effectiveness

Do you have a long-standing program that doesn’t meet changing needs? Are your volunteers resistant to changes that can improve program delivery? Your program’s effectiveness speaks to the success of volunteers – and their work – striving towards your organization’s mission. You can improve your volunteer program’s efficacy by understanding and eliminating the barriers to success.

 

Measure Impact

Are you going beyond efficiency and effectiveness and making lasting changes in the lives of clients? Do you know how to measure the direct impact of volunteers on clients? Even if you know your program’s impact is already felt or understood by the people who benefit from it, you can improve and advocate for your program by properly measuring and showcasing its impact. It will motivate your volunteers by showing them their impact, help you assess an overall direction for your volunteer program, and give you proof that your program is working that you can share with funders and decision makers.

 

How do you conduct an evaluation of your volunteer program in the middle of everything else you’ve got going on? Let us help you get started with “From Start to Finish: Building the Tools You Need to Evaluate your Volunteer Program” on April 21. You’ll leave this full day workshop with your evaluation questions written, logic model complete, achievable and well-planned goals established, data collection methods ready to go and a step-by-step plan to interpret your data. We’ll coach you through the process and you’ll be ready to take on your program evaluation with all the tools ready to go! Interested in learning more and signing up – click here and register today!

 

As Volunteer Toronto's Training Coordinator, Sammy Feilchenfeld develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations.

Tags:  evaluation  how to be more efficient in your volunteer program  Program evaluation  volunteer management  volunteer managers  volunteer programs  volunteers  ways to improve your volunteer program 

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